Friday, May 18, 2012

10 Best Career Options and Best Degrees


10 Best Career Options and Best Degrees




  • Actuarial Science
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Educational Administration and Supervision
  • Geological and Geophysical Engineering
  • Pharmacology
  • School Student Counseling
  • Agricultural Economics
  • Medical Technologies Technicians
  • Atmospheric Sciences and Meteorology
  • Environmental Engineering, Nursing, and Nuclear Industrial Radiology and Biological Technologies


Majored in Actuarial Science
An actuary is basically supposed to predict the future, estimating future risks and costs. Being able to do that well is so valuable to a company.
No shortage of options in astrophysics
It goes against the idea that to be part of science you need a Ph.D. That's a gross misconception.
I think you can have a 0% unemployment rate in astrophysics, because it's constantly evolving. The universe is huge and there just aren't enough eyes to study it. There's really never going to be a shortage of jobs
Work in a lab, with pharmacology degree
I've since started a master’s program at Columbia University and work part-time in a lab in the pathology department there.
I would say that's a pretty typical path. I don't know of anyone who studied pharmacology and just stopped at a bachelor's degree. The end game is nearly always to pursue some kind of schooling afterwards. Many end up going to grad school or working in laboratories.
Multiple job offers for geophysics students
The energy industry is just grasping at straws for people with geophysics experience.
I work in an environment where it's over 50% foreign people. That's not only telling about the people the energy industry is looking for, but also the fact that these large energy companies are simply not getting enough qualified students from American universities.
Research - Atmospheric Chemistry
The Center's previous study found that graduates with engineering and science majors tend to earn significantly more many than graduates with other college majors. (Petroleum engineering major will make 300 percent more over his or her lifetime than a peer who majored in counseling psychology, for example.)
But narrowing the results down to only the employment rate yields a wider range of fields that provide excellent job security. People who majored in some lower paying fields, such as school counseling, face an almost nonexistent chance of being unemployed.